Inside the Emotion of Twain’s ‘Rare Feeling’

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Rare Feeling, the new album from Twain, is aptly named for the experience the collection gives listeners as it unravels.

Explicitly, Twain is folk for the masses. Whatever chaos is happening around, Rare Feeling pulls you into a deep feeling of calm from the first chord. The album opener, Solar Pilgrim, strikes a presence that is hardly unmatched with its vocal talent and simplicity.

Twain’s Impact on Folk

“The Sorcerer,” dreamy as it is intriguing, puts an immediate trance on the listener. “The second I’ll close my eyes, you’ll be gone” repeats over and over, building emotion with each repetition.


Such vocal rarity carries throughout the album’s entirety. Sometimes folk falls into a trap of predictability, but songs like “Hank and Georgia” and “Freed From Doubt” speak for themselves. Further, it’s the contrast of closely intricate instruments that weave into a simple sound making the vocals shine.

In the blink of an eye, the sixth track begins, “Rare Feeling, vol. 2.” This record is the one that solidifies the album’s aesthetic listening experience. The instruments come out of nowhere with twang and vigor, punching its place into the nine-track record. Evocative and powerful, brilliantly executed, the title track transforms the experience of the album. Then, in a blink, the song exits as wildly as it enters.

The Man Behind The Feeling

“A voice for the ineffable that must be heard,” is how Big Thief describes Twain. This sentence can further be used to describe every track on Rare Feeling. Accordingly, each detail is rich in the feeling of importance, bringing the album together. Ultimately, it is this attention to detail, perhaps, that gives the record its nonchalant shine among others.

Twain is comprised of singer-songwriter Mt. Davidson, and the record is currently available via Keeled Scales. Presently, Davidson is currently gearing up to tour this fall, supporting The Deslondes. Select shows will feature Buck Meek of Big Thief.