4 Tips for Not Regretting Your New Tattoo

music tattoo

No longer a sign of gang membership or rebellion, tattoos have been embraced more enthusiastically by the millennial generation than those in times past. More and more musicians are sporting amazing artwork. Tattoos are unique forms of communication, a type of body art that speaks volumes about the bearer. However, this a permanent message, since tattoos last forever. This one reason the aging generation preferred to decline a decorative addition to the human body. This same recognition of indestructibility is what makes the idea of a tattoo so alluring to those who really do want to live forever. There are several things to know that can help you prepare for a new tattoo, helping ensure you don’t wake up the next morning and regret the permanent stamp of ink on your shoulder blade.

4 Tips To Prepare For New Ink

1. Not all artists are created equal.

Before you dash into the first tattoo parlor you see, you should do some research on the tattoo artists. A lot of people pick up the needle and claim to be a skilled tattooer, but that doesn’t mean you can trust what they will do. There is proper training and experience that goes into a quality tattoos shop and artists, and you should carefully study the online portfolio of work as you make your decision. The photos of prior customers should be clear, well-lit, recent, and recognizable. The best picture is one that reveals the tattoo after it has healed. This gives you the best look at the long-term image. Internet searching and client testimony are two ways to validate the skill of the artist.

2. Price doesn’t mean a thing.

 The cheaper a tattoo, the greater the probability that you are going to get what you pay for. If you are going to commit to a tattoo, you need to commit to the price tag of high-quality work. While it’s okay to get a ballpark price for what you want, you might want to consider saving for a few more weeks to get the best artist to give you the best tattoo. Things that are larger, more detailed, and have color are going to cost you a fair amount of money. Be prepared to spend a minimum of $100 if you want something that will be half-decent.

3. Think through the design.

So many people just drop into a tattoo shop on a whim and spend fifteen minutes browsing through the wall designs before settling on a cool little pattern that has a tag reading the Greek symbol of strength. Now unless your ancestors are from Greece or you opted for two years of Greek in high school, is your tattoos going to be the actual Greek symbol of strength? Even more disconcerting is your attraction to the pattern. Does it mean physical or emotional strength? Are you just getting it because it looks cool? Choosing your design should be done after careful thought and intense pattern searches. Your tattoo, and therefore the message it sends, is going to be with your body forever. You might want to know the what, the where, and the why long before you ever set foot in the tattoo parlor.

4. Visit the parlor in person.

Before you schedule your appointment, stop by the tattoo shop and look around. Check out the space, the cleanliness, the privacy, and the mood of the employees. If you get a sinking feeling or uneasiness about the place, you might want to pass and try again with another artist. The staff should welcome your questions and leave the decision-making pressure to car salesmen.

Tattoos are a lifetime commitment. It’s important that you know what you want and choose a tattoo artist who can make that vision come to life.

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