Christopher Bell – Innovative Cello Sound Will Draw You in

When one thinks of the cello usually a classical piece in a chamber music style comes to mind.  Granted the instrument originated in the 16th century, but innovative artists are able to take that classic sound and warp it into something fresh and new that will capture a listener’s attention.  A good example is the sound of our recent find Christopher Bell.

Christopher Bell

The original artist from Jamestown, New York is not your average cellist.  Christopher Bell uses various pedals in which he layers and distorts his electric cello creating quirky and catchy indie pop music.  He has a love for technology as well which has led him to even sample his cello in loops in a live setting.  Christopher Bell is a lifelong independent musician which has built him a reputation as a mastering engineer, as well as being the founder of IndieBooker.com, a website to help touring musicians book shows a lot easier.

The last full-length album, the eighth by Christopher Bell is titled Rust.  The title is fitting as he has decided to go with a rawer sound than his last couple records that aimed for a pop sheen.  Right from the opener, a cover of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”, you can taste the dirt and rust that Bell is going for on this one.  “Lost In The Rush” has more of that indie rock feel but with a noticeably original tone pushing the interesting instrumentation forward.  One song that stands out is “Sea Of Women” where the lyrical style is gravelled up a little to have the effect of classic singers like Tom Waits.  The album closes with “I Can’t Hear” which turns the listener a curve ball.  It stays raw and minimalistic but has a touch of Southern India musical style to it that will draw you in to hear each word.  Overall Rust is definitely an interesting and innovative listen.  You can learn more and have a listen at:

www.thechrisbell.com

www.christopherbell.bandcamp.com

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