Red Baraat Creates Sounds For the People With New Album

Red baraat

Sound the People is the newly released album by Bhangra band Red Baraat. The band utilizes their diverse background and experiences to create impactful, politically charged, and fun music. This creates a multilayered, meaningful soundscape that anyone and everyone can appreciate. Sound the People seeks to be the source of global community, an expression of the true nature of togetherness through music.

 

It’s a nine-track album featuring many notable artists of varying genres, some of which include comedian John Hodgman, poet Suheir Hammad, and Heems of Das Racist. The album was actually produced by Run the Jewels’ Little Shalimar. The contributions of such artists are incredibly important to the overall sound of Sound the People. Hammad’s feature is on the song “Vibrations”, a poem read over fast drums and subtle guitar work. It’s a beautiful song that could possibly be the one that drives their message home most directly.

 

“Next Level” is the first song on the album. It is a physically moving song in the best way. In fact, it will certainly elicit some form of dance. The beat is wicked fast and played impressively well. Red Baraat really are masterful in their musicianship and composition of the song. There is some impression of improvisation with the horn solo, which adds to the disjointed sonic landscape mirroring the current global climate.

 

Red Baraat Fuse Cultures With ‘Sound the People’

 

 

The title track on Red Baraat’s Sound the People is “Sound the People” featuring Heems. The band fuses their traditional, cultural instrumentation with Heems’ verses about the current political and social state. It states the disunity created when people do not understand or appreciate each other. That is the band’s main objective, to bring everyone together in global solidarity.

 

Red Baraat has been a staple in Punjab music and its space in America. They are paving a way for those who are culturally diverse to speak creatively and contribute to the framework of American music. Sound the People is important but, most of all, contains really enjoyable, meaningful songs.